brandorf.com The everyday ramblings of one nerd.

The Coin Door

The Coin Door was bought off of Ebay for about $30, it was in decent shape, the mechanisms worked, but it was rusted, and missing the lights and one of the $.25 plates. To restore it I disassembled it entirely and removed the rust with a wire brush (because it was originally powder-coayed, it's not necessary to remove ALL of the powder coating before painting, just make sure it is clean.) I painted it with Rustoleum Black Satin Spraypaint, the same paint I used for the top of the table, and then a coat of Minwax Spray Polycrylic, to help protect it from scratches. I had to replace the Midway Door plate because it was dented and scratched pretty badly, also, it was rivited in place, so I did more damage to it in removing it. I found a replacement at Quarterarcade, which just looks great. I used the cordless drill with a wire brush on all other metal parts to remove rust and corrosion. I bout a replacement $.25 plate, lamp holders and replacement bulbs from Bob Roberts.

  The complete disassembled coin door, you can see (from left to right) the coin mechs, the anti-tamper switch, coin door frame, coin mech holders, coin slots, and chutes, the coin counter (up from the frame) main door part, and the $.25 plates.

The Lock and key was a special annoyance. The lock that was on it originally was broken, so the Ebay seller included a seperate lock and key. This was good news, however, we ran into problems when it came time to install the coin door. The lock was too short! I doubt that this was intention on the part of the seller, but hey, I'm not about to let a $5.00 trip to the hardware store come between us! Coincidentally, one again Bob Roberts has come through with an excellent article on dealing with these types of locks, you should take a look here.

This is the Panel after everything was removed, and the rust was stripped away. The complete dissasembled coin door, you can see (from left to right) the coin mechs, the anti-tamper switch, coin door frame, coin mech holders, coin slots, and chutes, the coin counter (up from the frame) main door part, and the $.25 plates.
The reassembled coin door. At this point, I was waiting to catch up with the woorworking, so… … I could install it!
Here’s the lights installed behind the $.25 plates. They are wired up in parallel to the PC 12v power supply. Unfortunatley, I couldn’t quite figure out the coin counter, so it’s not actually connected to anything.
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